Date   
Re: VNA device on sale

kc0pah
 

This is why computer geeks and cybersecurity folks need to get into amateur radio!  Thank you for getting licensed! Mike (kc0pah)

 

 

https://www.darkreading.com/edge/theedge/from-1s-and-0s-to-wobbly-lines-the-radio-frequency-(rf)-security-starter-guide/b/d-id/1336999

 

From 1s & 0s to Wobbly Lines: The Radio Frequency (RF) Security Starter Guide

 

Although radio frequency energy (RF) communications are increasingly essential to modern wireless networking and IoT, the security of RF is notoriously lax.

It's almost impossible to think about modern IT and networking without bringing radio frequency energy (RF) into the picture. That means it's equally impossible to fully consider IT security without thinking about the implications of radio as both a Layer 1 component and a critical attack vector.

The problem for most IT and security professionals is that RF is all wibbly-wobbly and squishy. Rather than the neat, clean, on/off, one/zero of the digital domain, radio tends to be described in terms of frequencies and amplitudes, reflection and refraction, all of which are measured and described in the analog domain.

So for security professionals the questions become, why should they take the time to learn about this mysterious transmission layer, and where do they begin?

The Why
"Radio has changed how corporate networks interact with the Internet, meaning that almost all devices that employees bring into the office are communicating through the airwaves," says Joseph Carson, chief security scientist at Thycotic. And in addition to the IT uses of RF, there are IoT and OT uses as well as application uses in areas like public service and communications between locations and employees.

It's that variety of different ways in which RF can be used that make it important for security professionals to understand something of the basics of radio. "In the past, it was all about how to get an RJ45 connection to a network. Today, it is all about intercepting radio signals such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, 4G, and now 5G," says Carson.

The Danger
Once transmitted into space, a radio signal can be intercepted by anyone with a receiver tuned to the proper frequency. Building or buying a receiver for just about any frequency is easy, and new technology is making it even easier.

As Carson says, "The biggest challenge is that most radio signals are not encrypted, and with a good software-defined radio, you can easily intercept most RFs — such as airport communications, device broadcasts, weather stations, satellites, and even emergency communication."

Researchers have already demonstrated how RF exploits could be used to manipulate cardiac implants, heavy construction machineryemergency alert sirensin-flight aircraft, and much more.

Dangers are amplified when users expect radio communications to be private. "The attackers are exploiting a social expectation," says Fausto Oliveira, principal security architect at Acceptto. "People nowadays expect that public places provide wireless connectivity, and the attackers take advantage of that expectation."

The What
There's no question that communications over the radio of Wi-Fi is hazardous.

 

"The best ways to stay protected against this type of threat are to use a trusted VPN software to ensure that all your connectivity is encrypted," Oliveira says. "Do not connect to Wi-Fi access points that you do not recognize. Look at the content that is being presented when an access point requests for your personal data, and if you spot inconsistencies or the level of detail being requested makes you feel uncomfortable, disconnect from that network." 

Tackling the problem of vendor risk is not made any easier with technology solutions being added by the day.

The real danger is that similar risks can exist on other RF networks that may not have the same defensive possibilities that have been built into and bolted onto Wi-Fi. In these application-specific, IoT, OT, or cellular data network instances, knowing what the radio signals themselves bring to the infrastructure can be the key to understanding which security steps will be most effective.

So what should an infosec professional know about RF? Before launching into a brief explanation, some caution is in order.

"Radio frequency analysis and security is a complex topic that intersects several fields of information security, information theory, physics, and electrical engineering," says Charles Ragland, security engineer at Digital Shadows.

The combination of complexity and analog nature makes certain measurements and descriptions far more intricate operations than they are in the more straightforward digital realm. What follows are basics, with places to go to find richer explanations of the details.

There are two fundamental measurements of RF and a handful of very important ones. The two fundamentals are frequency and amplitude, and they tell us a lot about what's going on.

Frequency is the number of times the signal oscillates (goes from peak to peak) in one second. Measured in hertz, in radio applications frequencies can range from very low (3 kHz, or 3,000 oscillations per second) to very high (30 GHz, or 3 billion oscillations per second, which is  the highest frequency seen in most cases, though the radio spectrum extends up to 300 GHz).

Frequency is important because signals of different frequency react with their environment in different ways (on the whole, lower frequency signals go through solid walls more easily) and because more information can be sent in a second of higher frequency signal than of lower frequency signal.

Amplitude tells us how powerful the signal is — basically, how high the peaks are. Amplitude is important because it can have a profound impact on how far from its source a signal can be received, which environments it can survive, and the impact the signal has on objects in its environment.

There are other terms that are frequently used in RF descriptions. Wavelength is related to frequency: The lower the frequency, the farther apart the peaks are in space. For example, the wavelength of 60 kHz is around 3,000 miles, while the wavelength of 2.4 GHz (the frequency of 802.11b Wi-Fi and microwave ovens) is a bit less than 5 inches. This, as you might expect, has a profound impact on antennae for each.

Radio signals are polarized. They can be vertical, horizontal, or circular, and each is useful for different circumstances. Put in simplest terms, if the receiving antenna is in the same orientation as the transmitting antenna, the signal will tend to be received more clearly.

And then there are terms around the fact that radio signals bounce, bend, and refract through different materials and environments. These characteristics can explain why a radio signal is not being received where you hope, is being received where it shouldn't be, and can be received by those who shouldn't receive it.

The More
Ragland has a list of online resources he uses to help people learn about different aspects of RF communications. "Airheads forums are a great place to find tidbits of knowledge, including presentations covering the fundamentals of wireless networking," he says, noting the forum is run by, and tends to focus on, Aruba networking products.

To figure out which devices use which frequencies, he recommends the Signal Identification Wiki. In addition to basic data, he says, "Information found here, along with some easy-to-purchase USB adapters, can lead to all kinds of fun, like using your computer to open and close your garage door."

And for those who want to build or buy low-cost receivers to sniff RF in different circumstances, he recommends three sites:

·         The Kismet Wireless Tool

·         The RTL-SDR Blog

·         Gnu Radio

"The future of hacking is without a doubt going to be about listening to the airwaves and capturing them," Carson says. The time to learn about them is now.

Re: VNA device on sale

Scott Vince
 

There is also a great app by RepeaterBook 
Scott 
W9EQD 


On Feb 25, 2020, at 09:59, John Beatty <jebeatty@...> wrote:

R&L has the mini VNA device on sale today for those that didn't get one earlier.  Here's the link.

http://www.randl.com/shop/catalog/index.php

John - NO0I

Re: FYI, Ham Radio Featured on Kim Komando Podcast

Tim Spurgeon
 

Thanks, John, for the podcast. Kim does not look anything like I had imaged in my mind.

I thought she was a tall brunette. Kim is very knowledgeable about all things computer,
and she is on local AM or FM radio stations in Columbia (one time is Sunday afternoon).

Kim's podcast does a good job of reminding HAMS of continuing to be vigilant.

73

Tim
(W0TES)

***************************************

----- Original Message -----
From: "John W. Smith" <kc0hsb@...>
To: "main" <main@cmra.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 8:30:31 AM
Subject: [CMRA] FYI, Ham Radio Featured on Kim Komando Podcast

The Kim Komando on Demand podcast today features ham radio. It's called
"The Social Network Before Social Networks." She starts by talking about
the earthquake in San Francisco in 1989. The show is a little over 18
minutes.


Here's a link for more info and to listen.


https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/the-social-network-before-social-networks/id660921339?i=1000466614284


Incidentally, she mentions that her husband is a ham.


73,


John, KC0HSB



--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/

VNA device on sale

John Beatty
 

R&L has the mini VNA device on sale today for those that didn't get one earlier.  Here's the link.

http://www.randl.com/shop/catalog/index.php

John - NO0I

Re: FYI, Ham Radio Featured on Kim Komando Podcast

Gary Vaught - W9TIG
 

Yes!  Thank you, John!

-
Best Regards,
Gary D Vaught

We can engineer a solution to nearly any problem you can accurately define.

- somewhat anonymous



On Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 8:31 AM John Beatty <jebeatty@...> wrote:
Thanks John!

-----Original Message-----
From: main@CMRA.groups.io [mailto:main@CMRA.groups.io] On Behalf Of John W. Smith
Sent: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 8:31 AM
To: CMRA
Subject: [CMRA] FYI, Ham Radio Featured on Kim Komando Podcast

The Kim Komando on Demand podcast today features ham radio. It's called
"The Social Network Before Social Networks." She starts by talking about
the earthquake in San Francisco in 1989. The show is a little over 18
minutes.


Here's a link for more info and to listen.


https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/the-social-network-before-social-networks/id660921339?i=1000466614284


Incidentally, she mentions that her husband is a ham.


73,


John, KC0HSB



--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/








--
73
W9TIG

Gary Vaught

Re: FYI, Ham Radio Featured on Kim Komando Podcast

John Beatty
 

Thanks John!

-----Original Message-----
From: main@CMRA.groups.io [mailto:main@CMRA.groups.io] On Behalf Of John W. Smith
Sent: Tuesday, February 25, 2020 8:31 AM
To: CMRA
Subject: [CMRA] FYI, Ham Radio Featured on Kim Komando Podcast

The Kim Komando on Demand podcast today features ham radio. It's called
"The Social Network Before Social Networks." She starts by talking about
the earthquake in San Francisco in 1989. The show is a little over 18
minutes.


Here's a link for more info and to listen.


https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/the-social-network-before-social-networks/id660921339?i=1000466614284


Incidentally, she mentions that her husband is a ham.


73,


John, KC0HSB



--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/

FYI, Ham Radio Featured on Kim Komando Podcast

John W. Smith
 

The Kim Komando on Demand podcast today features ham radio. It's called "The Social Network Before Social Networks." She starts by talking about the earthquake in San Francisco in 1989. The show is a little over 18 minutes.


Here's a link for more info and to listen.


https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/the-social-network-before-social-networks/id660921339?i=1000466614284


Incidentally, she mentions that her husband is a ham.


73,


John, KC0HSB



--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/

FYI, Mobile Phone Service in the 1940's

John W. Smith
 

My son came across this 10 and a half minute YouTube video promoting mobile phone service in the 1940's. Granted, it's not directly related to ham radio, but it shows everything old is new again.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDy2tHCPdk8


73,


John, KC0HSB



--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/

Re: ARRL Podcasts Added to CMRA Site

Fred Dittrich
 

John

Thanks

73

Fred AE0FD

At 03:53 PM 2/20/2020, you wrote:
As previously promised, I've added the two new ARRL podcasts to the Links of Interest page on our club site. On the Air and Eclectic Tech are the first two entries you'll see under the heading for Podcasts & Videos.


https://k0si.net/links-of-interest/


73,


John, KC0HSB




--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/


ARRL Podcasts Added to CMRA Site

John W. Smith
 

As previously promised, I've added the two new ARRL podcasts to the Links of Interest page on our club site. On the Air and Eclectic Tech are the first two entries you'll see under the heading for Podcasts & Videos.


https://k0si.net/links-of-interest/


73,


John, KC0HSB




--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/

Weather Spotter Training Tonight.

Big Jon
 

FYI,

Boone County, MO

Thursday, February 20, 2020 6:30 - 8:30 pm

University of Missouri-Columbia

Stotler Lounge in Memorial Student Union

518 Hitt St, Columbia, MO 65201


73,

Logo
Jonathan Williams
President | ADØZE
mobile: (573)514-5773
email: ad0ze@...
Facebook icon  LinkedIn icon  Twitter icon  
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Re: K0SI-10 down

Bill McFarland - N0AXZ
 

Fred,
OK. Maybe we clashed, since I was just trying it too :)
Let me know of discrepancies. Should be good now for a while.
bill

On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 10:51 AM Fred Dittrich <fdittric@...> wrote:
Bill

I just tried it twice, The first time failed but then the second try worked correctly.

73

Fred AE0FD



At 10:03 AM 2/14/2020, you wrote:
Couldn’t tell what happened sometime after 4:00 yesterday afternoon.  Was not the cable disconnected but the computer thought it was. REBOOT!
K0SI-10 back on the air.Â
Bill

On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 7:33 AM Fred Dittrich <fdittric@...> wrote:
Hi

RMSExpress says:

*** Starting to call K0SI-10
*** Opening serial port COM9; 9600 baud; Kantronics
*** Connecting to K0SI-10
*** CONNECTED TO K0SI-10

73

Fred AE0FD




--
Bill



--
Bill N0AXZ

Re: K0SI-10 down

Fred Dittrich
 

Bill

I just tried it twice, The first time failed but then the second try worked correctly.

73

Fred AE0FD



At 10:03 AM 2/14/2020, you wrote:
Couldn’t tell what happened sometime after 4:00 yesterday afternoon.  Was not the cable disconnected but the computer thought it was. REBOOT!
K0SI-10 back on the air.Â
Bill

On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 7:33 AM Fred Dittrich <fdittric@...> wrote:
Hi

RMSExpress says:

*** Starting to call K0SI-10
*** Opening serial port COM9; 9600 baud; Kantronics
*** Connecting to K0SI-10
*** CONNECTED TO K0SI-10

73

Fred AE0FD




--
Bill

Good reading

kc0pah
 

from 08 Jul 2019 | 12:05 GMT

Is Ham Radio a Hobby, a Utility…or Both? A Battle Over Spectrum Heats Up

Some think automated radio emails are mucking up the spectrum reserved for amateur radio, while others say these new offerings provide a useful service

Read the full article here

Sorry for dupes if you are in both groups,
--Mike aka

Re: K0SI-10 down

Bill McFarland - N0AXZ
 

Couldn’t tell what happened sometime after 4:00 yesterday afternoon.  Was not the cable disconnected but the computer thought it was. REBOOT!
K0SI-10 back on the air. 
Bill

On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 7:33 AM Fred Dittrich <fdittric@...> wrote:
Hi

RMSExpress says:

*** Starting to call K0SI-10
*** Opening serial port COM9; 9600 baud; Kantronics
*** Connecting to K0SI-10
*** CONNECTED TO K0SI-10

73

Fred AE0FD




--
Bill

Re: K0SI-10 down

Bill McFarland - N0AXZ
 

thought I fixed it yesterday, but now again the computer is not seeing the TNC. Yesterday the USB cable had come out. Will see what it is today!
bill

On Fri, Feb 14, 2020 at 7:33 AM Fred Dittrich <fdittric@...> wrote:
Hi

RMSExpress says:

*** Starting to call K0SI-10
*** Opening serial port COM9; 9600 baud; Kantronics
*** Connecting to K0SI-10
*** CONNECTED TO K0SI-10

73

Fred AE0FD






--
Bill N0AXZ

K0SI-10 down

Fred Dittrich
 

Hi

RMSExpress says:

*** Starting to call K0SI-10
*** Opening serial port COM9; 9600 baud; Kantronics
*** Connecting to K0SI-10
*** CONNECTED TO K0SI-10

73

Fred AE0FD

Element 4 study

Fred Dittrich
 

Hi

amateurlogic.tv is starting to go through the Extra exam questions. Since they go through a few questions per week this will give you time to research each set of questions for a week before the next set is presented.

This might give you a relaxed opportunity to bulk up on the EE elements of radio even if you don't test for Element 4.

73

Fred AE0FD

Re: RE club projector

Ralph Howard
 

Also usefull to use a Raspberry Pi on a VGA moniter.
I have the dongle type, but this adapter just mounts to the VGA socket, i bit cleaner I think.

73


Ralph Howard
WD6BGN


From: main@CMRA.groups.io <main@CMRA.groups.io> on behalf of Bill McFarland - N0AXZ <billmcfarland10@...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 9:35:28 AM
To: Central Missouri Radio Association <main@cmra.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [CMRA] RE club projector
 
Thanks Fred,
I'll just have a spare now :)
bill

On Wed, Feb 12, 2020 at 6:29 AM Fred Dittrich <fdittric@...> wrote:
Hi

FYI, when I gave the January presentation I bought an HDMI-DVI
adapter cable and stuck it in the side pocket of the projector for
everyone's use.

73

Fred AE0FD






--
Bill N0AXZ

Re: RE club projector

Bill McFarland - N0AXZ
 

Thanks Fred,
I'll just have a spare now :)
bill

On Wed, Feb 12, 2020 at 6:29 AM Fred Dittrich <fdittric@...> wrote:
Hi

FYI, when I gave the January presentation I bought an HDMI-DVI
adapter cable and stuck it in the side pocket of the projector for
everyone's use.

73

Fred AE0FD






--
Bill N0AXZ