Date   

FYI: Ham Talk Live Discusses Traffic Handling

John W. Smith
 

This evening's episode of Ham Talk Live talked about NTS traffic handling. Below I've put the link to the show page.


https://www.spreaker.com/user/hamtalklive/episode-189-nts-message-handling


73,


John, KC0HSB



--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/


Upcoming tower safety program

Fred Dittrich
 

Hi

On this week's Ham Nation Bob Heil K9EID said that this program will have a series of three programs focusing on tower safety starting on December 4. Even if you don't have a tower this is going to be good information to have in your mind's memory bank.

73

Fred AE0FD


Re: VE Test Session This Monday

Jon Cole
 

Thanks Jon!

I will be in my office most of tomorrow and Friday, with a few hours in Callaway County along the way.  Call or text me and I will be sure to be there or at least be able to get the box to you.  I show up by 8:30 and leave around 5:30 usually.

Jon Cole, N0OFJ
VE Liaison

On Wednesday, November 6, 2019, 9:29:45 PM CST, Big Jon via Groups.Io <ad0ze@...> wrote:



I can. Let me know what  the best time to grab the box.

Sent from ProtonMail Mobile


On Wed, Nov 6, 2019 at 21:28, Jon Cole via Groups.Io <colepls@...> wrote:
All VEs,

There is a test session for the current ham class this Monday at 8:00 PM at the Columbia Career Center north of Rock Bridge High School. I cannot be there. Can another VE take the box and run the session?

Jon Cole, N0OFJ
VE Liaison





Re: VE Test Session This Monday

Big Jon
 


I can. Let me know what the best time to grab the box.

Sent from ProtonMail Mobile


On Wed, Nov 6, 2019 at 21:28, Jon Cole via Groups.Io <colepls@...> wrote:
All VEs,

There is a test session for the current ham class this Monday at 8:00 PM at the Columbia Career Center north of Rock Bridge High School. I cannot be there. Can another VE take the box and run the session?

Jon Cole, N0OFJ
VE Liaison





VE Test Session This Monday

Jon Cole
 

All VEs,

There is a test session for the current ham class this Monday at 8:00 PM at the Columbia Career Center north of Rock Bridge High School. I cannot be there. Can another VE take the box and run the session?

Jon Cole, N0OFJ
VE Liaison


Re: Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?

John Beatty
 

Good stuff Chris, thanks.

Also, I have a 564 and I love it.  I love it so much I had, wait for it, custom finger tips made of bloodwood for it.  For the money you can't beat it.

John - NO0I  tu, . .


From: main@CMRA.groups.io <main@CMRA.groups.io> on behalf of Tim Spurgeon <tims173@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 5, 2019 10:04 PM
To: main@CMRA.groups.io <main@CMRA.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [CMRA] Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?
 
Chris(K0PHP),

I am interested!  But the prices I see are around $1000 for Google Glass.

73

Tim E. Spurgeon
(W0TES)

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Swisher" <Komu8ce@...>
To: cmra@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 4, 2019 4:14:59 PM
Subject: [CMRA] Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?

I'll ask before the CW guys chime in (we all know their answer). And I know
listening to 7.200 at night what SSB operations can do to an alleged
functional brain.

I decided to make my last remaining neuron (Bessie) exercise a little more
by learning cw in a real, qualitative way. I want to do better than my
straight key, multiple mistakes at 10 wpm, any mode has to be better than
this, pain in the hind end - existence.

I bought a second hand MFJ-564 Iambic key at Raytown, which has a very nice
hamfest, by the way, just across the road from a great breakfast joint
named The Big Biscuit. I little cleaning, replace the 1/4" stereo plug with
a 3.5mm for the Kenwood TS-480HX, and find the right spot to plug it in.
Don't use "key", it will only get you a single contact to key the
transmitter. Look for the one labeled (you guessed it) "paddle". Now I get
to figure out what Iambic A and B means, how to set the speed, and -Holy
Smokes - I have three memories I can put up to 250 dots each into!
But I digress, how can something invented around the Civil Way era help me
keep my sanity?

If you said something about it, I wasn't listening. Sorry.
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00383/full

Yes, Virginia, there is a study out there that says you can stave off
dementia by learning a second language. Maybe this won't be a bad
experiment after all. Maybe in an era of dying languages, I can do my part
to preserve the lost language of the inconvenienced electron.

Or better yet, can I learn Morse Code without studying the AMECO charts and
playing those records for hours at a time in the upstairs bedroom? Why yes,
Virginia, it appears so!
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161028115427.htm

Now, who has Google glass that wants to help in the experiment? My wife
could benefit from all this science going on! (But don't tell her just yet,
she has no idea about my relationship with Bessie.)

'73
de K0PHP sk






Re: Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?

Tim Spurgeon
 

Chris(K0PHP),

I am interested! But the prices I see are around $1000 for Google Glass.

73

Tim E. Spurgeon
(W0TES)

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Swisher" <Komu8ce@...>
To: cmra@groups.io
Sent: Monday, November 4, 2019 4:14:59 PM
Subject: [CMRA] Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?

I'll ask before the CW guys chime in (we all know their answer). And I know
listening to 7.200 at night what SSB operations can do to an alleged
functional brain.

I decided to make my last remaining neuron (Bessie) exercise a little more
by learning cw in a real, qualitative way. I want to do better than my
straight key, multiple mistakes at 10 wpm, any mode has to be better than
this, pain in the hind end - existence.

I bought a second hand MFJ-564 Iambic key at Raytown, which has a very nice
hamfest, by the way, just across the road from a great breakfast joint
named The Big Biscuit. I little cleaning, replace the 1/4" stereo plug with
a 3.5mm for the Kenwood TS-480HX, and find the right spot to plug it in.
Don't use "key", it will only get you a single contact to key the
transmitter. Look for the one labeled (you guessed it) "paddle". Now I get
to figure out what Iambic A and B means, how to set the speed, and -Holy
Smokes - I have three memories I can put up to 250 dots each into!
But I digress, how can something invented around the Civil Way era help me
keep my sanity?

If you said something about it, I wasn't listening. Sorry.
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00383/full

Yes, Virginia, there is a study out there that says you can stave off
dementia by learning a second language. Maybe this won't be a bad
experiment after all. Maybe in an era of dying languages, I can do my part
to preserve the lost language of the inconvenienced electron.

Or better yet, can I learn Morse Code without studying the AMECO charts and
playing those records for hours at a time in the upstairs bedroom? Why yes,
Virginia, it appears so!
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161028115427.htm

Now, who has Google glass that wants to help in the experiment? My wife
could benefit from all this science going on! (But don't tell her just yet,
she has no idea about my relationship with Bessie.)

'73
de K0PHP sk


Re: Declassified KH-9 talk

Don - KM0R
 

Very interesting Fred, thanks!

For those interested, there is a KH-9 in the Wright Patterson Air museum at
Dayton. They have a KH-8 and a KH-7 on display as well. If you haven't
ever toured the museum, you might plan to go to Hamvention a day early and
tour the museum if you ever get the chance.

Don - KM0R

-----Original Message-----
From: main@CMRA.groups.io <main@CMRA.groups.io> On Behalf Of Fred Dittrich
Sent: Monday, November 4, 2019 14:49
To: main@cmra.groups.io
Subject: [CMRA] Declassified KH-9 talk

Hi

For those who like electromechanical marvels, watch this talk by an insider
who worked inside the KH-9 program, the last spy satellite to use film.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_PlDD_rMB7I Colloquium: Phil
Pressel - Hexagon KH-9 Spy Satellite

73

Fred AE0FD


Re: Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?

Gary Vaught - W9TIG
 

Dang your hide, Swisher!

First, you take away my Saturday morning coffee relaxation, and now you're going on about things I can't have!  Who are you, really?  Robin Leach?  Showing me things I'll never be able to afford, even if they were available.

Well, it's good to know this is out there for the select few.  Now, I have to figure out how I can learn CW and stave off the dementia. 

-
Best Regards,
Gary D Vaught

We can engineer a solution to nearly any problem you can accurately define.

- somewhat anonymous



On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 4:15 PM Chris Swisher <Komu8ce@...> wrote:
I'll ask before the CW guys chime in (we all know their answer). And I know listening to 7.200 at night what SSB operations can do to an alleged functional brain.

I decided to make my last remaining neuron (Bessie) exercise a little more by learning cw in a real, qualitative way. I want to do better than my straight key, multiple mistakes at 10 wpm, any mode has to be better than this, pain in the hind end - existence.

I bought a second hand MFJ-564 Iambic key at Raytown, which has a very nice hamfest, by the way, just across the road from a great breakfast joint named The Big Biscuit. I little cleaning, replace the 1/4" stereo plug with a 3.5mm for the Kenwood TS-480HX, and find the right spot to plug it in. Don't use "key", it will only get you a single contact to key the transmitter. Look for the one labeled (you guessed it) "paddle". Now I get to figure out what Iambic A and B means, how to set the speed, and -Holy Smokes - I have three memories I can put up to 250 dots each into!
But I digress, how can something invented around the Civil Way era help me keep my sanity?

If you said something about it, I wasn't listening. Sorry. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00383/full

Yes, Virginia, there is a study out there that says you can stave off dementia by learning a second language. Maybe this won't be a bad experiment after all. Maybe in an era of dying languages, I can do my part to preserve the lost language of the inconvenienced electron.

Or better yet, can I learn Morse Code without studying the AMECO charts and playing those records for hours at a time in the upstairs bedroom? Why yes, Virginia, it appears so! https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161028115427.htm

Now, who has Google glass that wants to help in the experiment? My wife could benefit from all this science going on! (But don't tell her just yet, she has no idea about my relationship with Bessie.)

'73
de K0PHP sk


--
73
W9TIG

Gary Vaught


Re: Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?

Ernest Shaw
 

If I had a glass, I would totally let you try this out for me.  But alas, I was not selected as one of the few.

ES

On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 4:15 PM Chris Swisher <Komu8ce@...> wrote:
I'll ask before the CW guys chime in (we all know their answer). And I know listening to 7.200 at night what SSB operations can do to an alleged functional brain.

I decided to make my last remaining neuron (Bessie) exercise a little more by learning cw in a real, qualitative way. I want to do better than my straight key, multiple mistakes at 10 wpm, any mode has to be better than this, pain in the hind end - existence.

I bought a second hand MFJ-564 Iambic key at Raytown, which has a very nice hamfest, by the way, just across the road from a great breakfast joint named The Big Biscuit. I little cleaning, replace the 1/4" stereo plug with a 3.5mm for the Kenwood TS-480HX, and find the right spot to plug it in. Don't use "key", it will only get you a single contact to key the transmitter. Look for the one labeled (you guessed it) "paddle". Now I get to figure out what Iambic A and B means, how to set the speed, and -Holy Smokes - I have three memories I can put up to 250 dots each into!
But I digress, how can something invented around the Civil Way era help me keep my sanity?

If you said something about it, I wasn't listening. Sorry. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00383/full

Yes, Virginia, there is a study out there that says you can stave off dementia by learning a second language. Maybe this won't be a bad experiment after all. Maybe in an era of dying languages, I can do my part to preserve the lost language of the inconvenienced electron.

Or better yet, can I learn Morse Code without studying the AMECO charts and playing those records for hours at a time in the upstairs bedroom? Why yes, Virginia, it appears so! https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161028115427.htm

Now, who has Google glass that wants to help in the experiment? My wife could benefit from all this science going on! (But don't tell her just yet, she has no idea about my relationship with Bessie.)

'73
de K0PHP sk


Can Morse Code Help Your Brain?

Chris Swisher
 

I'll ask before the CW guys chime in (we all know their answer). And I know listening to 7.200 at night what SSB operations can do to an alleged functional brain.

I decided to make my last remaining neuron (Bessie) exercise a little more by learning cw in a real, qualitative way. I want to do better than my straight key, multiple mistakes at 10 wpm, any mode has to be better than this, pain in the hind end - existence.

I bought a second hand MFJ-564 Iambic key at Raytown, which has a very nice hamfest, by the way, just across the road from a great breakfast joint named The Big Biscuit. I little cleaning, replace the 1/4" stereo plug with a 3.5mm for the Kenwood TS-480HX, and find the right spot to plug it in. Don't use "key", it will only get you a single contact to key the transmitter. Look for the one labeled (you guessed it) "paddle". Now I get to figure out what Iambic A and B means, how to set the speed, and -Holy Smokes - I have three memories I can put up to 250 dots each into!
But I digress, how can something invented around the Civil Way era help me keep my sanity?

If you said something about it, I wasn't listening. Sorry. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2017.00383/full

Yes, Virginia, there is a study out there that says you can stave off dementia by learning a second language. Maybe this won't be a bad experiment after all. Maybe in an era of dying languages, I can do my part to preserve the lost language of the inconvenienced electron.

Or better yet, can I learn Morse Code without studying the AMECO charts and playing those records for hours at a time in the upstairs bedroom? Why yes, Virginia, it appears so! https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161028115427.htm

Now, who has Google glass that wants to help in the experiment? My wife could benefit from all this science going on! (But don't tell her just yet, she has no idea about my relationship with Bessie.)

'73
de K0PHP sk


Declassified KH-9 talk

Fred Dittrich
 

Hi

For those who like electromechanical marvels, watch this talk by an insider who worked inside the KH-9 program, the last spy satellite to use film.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_PlDD_rMB7I Colloquium: Phil Pressel - Hexagon KH-9 Spy Satellite

73

Fred AE0FD


Re: Obituary for Marie Taylor KD0AXG SK

Mike Morgan
 

Thank you Fred. A very moving Obituary.

----- Original Message -----
From: "fdittric" <fdittric@...>
To: "main" <main@cmra.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2019 3:17:45 PM
Subject: [CMRA] Obituary for Marie Taylor KD0AXG SK

All

Hank KD0BVQ requested that I post his obituary for Marie. See below.

The memorial service will be 2 miles or so from the nearest asphalt
road and I assume that it will be private. Please consider donating
to the hospice mentioned at the end. They did a great service for Marie.

73

Fred AE0FD

******************

Marie died Friday 25 October 2019 after a long battle with breast cancer.

Marie wants cremation and a memorial ceremony in a few weeks or month
so all who wish can have time to make arrangements. It will be led
by our dear friend Sharon, in traditional Native tradition, ending
with having her ashes interred in the Native burial site at the top
of our hill, joining those of Pete Noce and our dear beloved Buddha
Kitty as well as previous Natives. We will circle up and pass the
Talking Stick around s the holder may say anything they wish (or be
silent and pass it on) As we share our thoughts and stories will all
come to know more of Marie collectively than we did individually.

Marie considered both her cancer and her death to be a blessing and
said so many times. She was deeply Zen Buddhist and these are
fundamental tenets of Zen. Some have told me they don't understand
how cancer and death could be blessings. If you look into that
literature you will come to a more profound understanding of
Marie. Please understand that I don't fault anyone for thinking and
feeling the way they do. I just offer this as a way for them to
understand how differently Marie thought and felt about this.

As a direct consequence of her profound Zen, when she got the news of
her ct scans in June she told me that this blessing freed her to drop
all other irrelevant obligations, and live and love with me in Zen
simplicity, maximizing her enjoyment to the end. She embarked on
dumping huge quantities of encumbrances to free her mind and be in
the present moment as much as possible. To sit with me in Zen
meditation mornings and sunset. To accept the challenges of losing
her morning bike ride and then even her ability to walk, as further
simplicity in her life.

I don't mean to make a saint of her. We had some painful times that
removed us from the present moment. But she always got back. We
acknowledged the Hospice motto "to live until you die" and she lived
powerfully and beautifully always and even more so during her last four months.

And it was truly a blessing for both of us. Not all blessings are
easy. This one had its difficult times but she never lost sight of
the blessing.

Her death was especially a blessing. When she awoke that morning
something broke in her belly and she had raging pain that took 1 1/2
hours to get under control with large amounts of morphine and help
from the urgently summoned hospice nurse. Pain broke thru 1/2 hour
later, and it took more breakthru morphine, then sufficient
maintenance morphine ongoingly to assure she was peaceful and pain
free till she breathed her last in the next hours. By which time
her entire sibship had arrived from StLouis, as well as Dave and
Geoff, and all stayed until she was taken to the mortuary.

She truly lived until she died. As the cancer progressed she took
each small setback or loss as another challenge which she always
met. Creative as always, her last and unfinished job was working on
repair of a lovely quilt of her creation, worn out by years of loving
use. She continued studying Chinese and traditional Chinese medicine
and acupuncture and qi points and as was as active as possible in Tai
Chi given that she was wheelchair bound. We rented a golf car and
built a series of ramps so she could get in it and ride the property
and have fun. She got out 3 or 4 times in her final month, that
way. She never gave in to disappointment or depression but just kept
living till her very last day.

She got the scans (reporting extensive spread of cancer to liver and
bones) a few days after our anniversary in July, and lived joyously
and lovingly with me until she departed on Friday 25 October. We had
almost daily opportunity to sit in quiet meditation on the back porch
we built together and watch sunset in this paradise. We cleaned out
and simplified so we could live a simple Zen life together. We
loved and treasured our time together and we knew the cancer was
truly a blessing. Marie told me that one of the most important goals
of her life was to make sure her Mom and Dad were able to spend the
end of their lives in their home. Since she was able to help make
sure this happened, she felt that she had accomplished one very
important purpose of her life, and she was satisfied. She helped her
mother die peacefully surrounded by her loving family and hoped to
get to die that way herself. We made it, and she's safe now.

We talked about and agreed on many things during this time and one
was on the Zen tradition of joyously celebrating the good fortune of
one who got to depart before us, having no fear of death. When my
turn comes I hope to do as well and beautifully as she did. she said
she wished she could become a cloud of energy encircling the earth
with peace and love, because that's what Earth needs so desperately now.

We strongly request no flowers, cards, food or baked goods, and
especially no consolation telephone calls (regular kind ok). If you
wish to do something Marie would love for you to do, make a donation
to the hospice that cared so lovingly and expertly in her final months.
Preferred Hospice
1900 N Providence Rd suite 311
Columbia Missouri 65202


Obituary for Marie Taylor KD0AXG SK

Fred Dittrich
 

All

Hank KD0BVQ requested that I post his obituary for Marie. See below.

The memorial service will be 2 miles or so from the nearest asphalt road and I assume that it will be private. Please consider donating to the hospice mentioned at the end. They did a great service for Marie.

73

Fred AE0FD

******************

Marie died Friday 25 October 2019 after a long battle with breast cancer.

Marie wants cremation and a memorial ceremony in a few weeks or month so all who wish can have time to make arrangements. It will be led by our dear friend Sharon, in traditional Native tradition, ending with having her ashes interred in the Native burial site at the top of our hill, joining those of Pete Noce and our dear beloved Buddha Kitty as well as previous Natives. We will circle up and pass the Talking Stick around s the holder may say anything they wish (or be silent and pass it on) As we share our thoughts and stories will all come to know more of Marie collectively than we did individually.

Marie considered both her cancer and her death to be a blessing and said so many times. She was deeply Zen Buddhist and these are fundamental tenets of Zen. Some have told me they don't understand how cancer and death could be blessings. If you look into that literature you will come to a more profound understanding of Marie. Please understand that I don't fault anyone for thinking and feeling the way they do. I just offer this as a way for them to understand how differently Marie thought and felt about this.

As a direct consequence of her profound Zen, when she got the news of her ct scans in June she told me that this blessing freed her to drop all other irrelevant obligations, and live and love with me in Zen simplicity, maximizing her enjoyment to the end. She embarked on dumping huge quantities of encumbrances to free her mind and be in the present moment as much as possible. To sit with me in Zen meditation mornings and sunset. To accept the challenges of losing her morning bike ride and then even her ability to walk, as further simplicity in her life.

I don't mean to make a saint of her. We had some painful times that removed us from the present moment. But she always got back. We acknowledged the Hospice motto "to live until you die" and she lived powerfully and beautifully always and even more so during her last four months.

And it was truly a blessing for both of us. Not all blessings are easy. This one had its difficult times but she never lost sight of the blessing.

Her death was especially a blessing. When she awoke that morning something broke in her belly and she had raging pain that took 1 1/2 hours to get under control with large amounts of morphine and help from the urgently summoned hospice nurse. Pain broke thru 1/2 hour later, and it took more breakthru morphine, then sufficient maintenance morphine ongoingly to assure she was peaceful and pain free till she breathed her last in the next hours. By which time her entire sibship had arrived from StLouis, as well as Dave and Geoff, and all stayed until she was taken to the mortuary.

She truly lived until she died. As the cancer progressed she took each small setback or loss as another challenge which she always met. Creative as always, her last and unfinished job was working on repair of a lovely quilt of her creation, worn out by years of loving use. She continued studying Chinese and traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture and qi points and as was as active as possible in Tai Chi given that she was wheelchair bound. We rented a golf car and built a series of ramps so she could get in it and ride the property and have fun. She got out 3 or 4 times in her final month, that way. She never gave in to disappointment or depression but just kept living till her very last day.

She got the scans (reporting extensive spread of cancer to liver and bones) a few days after our anniversary in July, and lived joyously and lovingly with me until she departed on Friday 25 October. We had almost daily opportunity to sit in quiet meditation on the back porch we built together and watch sunset in this paradise. We cleaned out and simplified so we could live a simple Zen life together. We loved and treasured our time together and we knew the cancer was truly a blessing. Marie told me that one of the most important goals of her life was to make sure her Mom and Dad were able to spend the end of their lives in their home. Since she was able to help make sure this happened, she felt that she had accomplished one very important purpose of her life, and she was satisfied. She helped her mother die peacefully surrounded by her loving family and hoped to get to die that way herself. We made it, and she's safe now.

We talked about and agreed on many things during this time and one was on the Zen tradition of joyously celebrating the good fortune of one who got to depart before us, having no fear of death. When my turn comes I hope to do as well and beautifully as she did. she said she wished she could become a cloud of energy encircling the earth with peace and love, because that's what Earth needs so desperately now.

We strongly request no flowers, cards, food or baked goods, and especially no consolation telephone calls (regular kind ok). If you wish to do something Marie would love for you to do, make a donation to the hospice that cared so lovingly and expertly in her final months.
Preferred Hospice
1900 N Providence Rd suite 311
Columbia Missouri 65202


October Meeting Minutes

John W. Smith
 

Minutes for October's CMRA meeting are available at https://k0si.net/cmra-meeting-minutes/ . Click on October for 2019 to view or download.


73,


John, KC0HSB



--
This message came to you from
John Wesley Smith
kc0hsb@...
Find musings of an eclectic pilgrim at
https://johnwesleysmith.com/


Re: NanoVNA

Brad Wilmot
 

I’ve got one (was given to me), but the font is way too small for me (I’m legally blind), so I haven’t been able to really try it out yet (also, mine didn’t come with a battery, and I haven’t found one yet…)

I have an AA170, and I can read it, so unless someone comes up with legally-blind-friendly firmware for the nVNA, I’ll likely get rid of it.

 

Brad Wilmot

Systems Administrator

University Place Apartments

W0VHA

 

From: main@CMRA.groups.io <main@CMRA.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Swisher
Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2019 10:16 AM
To: tims173@...; cmra@groups.io
Subject: Re: [CMRA] NanoVNA

 

Tim (and CMRA members),

 

The following is the observations and opinions of one quasi-literate and easily distracted ham radio operator:

1. Amazon is your friend, read the peoples' comments who take the time to rate their experiences;

2. The NanoVNA was a collaborative project with a really smart dude with a great idea. A cheap, easily manufactured piece of test equipment that can be improved upon without spending a fortune. The Chinese have taken low cost manufacturing to an art, often at the cost of component (and shielding) removal. There are several versions out there, Mine came with a battery and without shielding. I can take the time to add a diode for battery monitoring and shielding to improve RF isolation, it wasn't in my unit.

3. Don't expect the results that a $60k commercial Vector Network Analyzer will give, be realistic in the returns, and figure out ways to improve your interpretation of the results.

4.The firmware that shipped with my unit was hopelessly behind the curve on the capabilities that are currency offered. The small screen size and my lack of Superman vision led me to tie it into my laptop. To make that connection I had to learn to update firmware using Dfuse software (you'll learn about it later) across a USB in Windows 10. Each of these parts have many facets that could "brick" your new $50 investment.

5. Join the groups.io NanoVNA-users. Like drinking from a firehose, the secret is to slowly acclimate yourself to the environment then jump in. The knowledge base there is incredible, both technically and operationally. (Does the hardware allow this new measurement to be performed?)

6. Check out my 160 meter antenna sweep. It is a 65 foot grounded Rohn 25 with a three element Moseley TA-33M. Gamma shunt fed at 56 feet, the tri-bander acts as a capacitance hat. I had only a VSWR meter and a grid dip oscillator to find the resonant frequency of the tower. I guessed well, it appears.

Notice as well that VSWR(lower right) is a poor substitute for return loss(upper right), which is a much more accurate indication of antenna efficiency. I have worked 42 states and 8 countries on 160 using this antenna, and winter is around the corner!

Here is a phased pair of Cushcraft 11 element two meter yagis.

 

Two things to note: I may have had a aberrant measurement while I moved a feedline. The sweep took about 5 minutes. Ignore that and imagine a smoothed line. There are two different resonant frequencies of this system. It could be that I wasn't exact with the electrical lengths of my homebrew phasing harness, or the antennas may not be tune to the same point of resonance. Either way, increasing usable bandwidth across two meters is a good thing at my QTH.

 

I'm still learning how to use the other capabilities of the unit, including time domain reflectometry. Being able to spot cable faults, and reasonably measure length will save me time in the long run. If you want to expand your vocabulary in RF, which is a good thing, this is a good investment. When you figure out that you need lab grade measurements, this will be a fond memory.

I can put on a presentation that will leave CMRA glassy eyed and asleep if necessary. Alternatively, I might expose myself as a fraud on the RF expert level.

 

On Thu, Oct 24, 2019 at 9:16 AM <tims173@...> wrote:

Chris,

Who did you buy your NanoVNA from.  I have looked on eBay and noticed there is quite a variety of combinations of pieces and parts from different sellers.

After testing it, do you still recommend it?

Thanks.

73

Tim E. Spurgeon
W0TES


Re: NanoVNA

Tim Spurgeon
 

Chris,

Thanks for the informative and humorous reply to my question, and thank you for buying the NanoVNA and investigating its performance.

73

Tim E. Spurgeon
W0TES

**************************************

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Swisher" <komu8ce@...>
To: tims173@..., cmra@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2019 10:15:39 AM
Subject: Re: NanoVNA

Tim (and CMRA members),

The following is the observations and opinions of one quasi-literate and
easily distracted ham radio operator:
1. Amazon is your friend, read the peoples' comments who take the time to
rate their experiences;
2. The NanoVNA was a collaborative project with a really smart dude with a
great idea. A cheap, easily manufactured piece of test equipment that can
be improved upon without spending a fortune. The Chinese have taken low
cost manufacturing to an art, often at the cost of component (and
shielding) removal. There are several versions out there, Mine came with a
battery and without shielding. I can take the time to add a diode for
battery monitoring and shielding to improve RF isolation, it wasn't in my
unit.
3. Don't expect the results that a $60k commercial Vector Network Analyzer
will give, be realistic in the returns, and figure out ways to improve your
interpretation of the results.
4.The firmware that shipped with my unit was hopelessly behind the curve on
the capabilities that are currency offered. The small screen size and my
lack of Superman vision led me to tie it into my laptop. To make that
connection I had to learn to update firmware using Dfuse software (you'll
learn about it later) across a USB in Windows 10. Each of these parts have
many facets that could "brick" your new $50 investment.
5. Join the groups.io NanoVNA-users. Like drinking from a firehose, the
secret is to slowly acclimate yourself to the environment then jump in. The
knowledge base there is incredible, both technically and operationally.
(Does the hardware allow this new measurement to be performed?)
6. Check out my 160 meter antenna sweep. It is a 65 foot grounded Rohn 25
with a three element Moseley TA-33M. Gamma shunt fed at 56 feet, the
tri-bander acts as a capacitance hat. I had only a VSWR meter and a grid
dip oscillator to find the resonant frequency of the tower. I guessed well,
it appears.
[image: NanoVNA160MVERT.jpg]
Notice as well that VSWR(lower right) is a poor substitute for return
loss(upper right), which is a much more accurate indication of antenna
efficiency. I have worked 42 states and 8 countries on 160 using this
antenna, and winter is around the corner!
Here is a phased pair of Cushcraft 11 element two meter yagis.
[image: NanoVNA2Mdual11elbeams.jpg]

Two things to note: I may have had a aberrant measurement while I moved a
feedline. The sweep took about 5 minutes. Ignore that and imagine a
smoothed line. There are two different resonant frequencies of this system.
It could be that I wasn't exact with the electrical lengths of my homebrew
phasing harness, or the antennas may not be tune to the same point of
resonance. Either way, increasing usable bandwidth across two meters is a
good thing at my QTH.

I'm still learning how to use the other capabilities of the unit, including
time domain reflectometry. Being able to spot cable faults, and reasonably
measure length will save me time in the long run. If you want to expand
your vocabulary in RF, which is a good thing, this is a good investment.
When you figure out that you need lab grade measurements, this will be a
fond memory.
I can put on a presentation that will leave CMRA glassy eyed and asleep if
necessary. Alternatively, I might expose myself as a fraud on the RF expert
level.

On Thu, Oct 24, 2019 at 9:16 AM <tims173@...> wrote:

Chris,

Who did you buy your NanoVNA from. I have looked on eBay and noticed
there is quite a variety of combinations of pieces and parts from different
sellers.

After testing it, do you still recommend it?

Thanks.

73

Tim E. Spurgeon
W0TES


Re: NanoVNA

dooda day
 

Thanks for these comments.  This is a nifty device, within its limits.

Dave

On Thu, Oct 24, 2019 at 10:16 AM Chris Swisher <Komu8ce@...> wrote:
Tim (and CMRA members),

The following is the observations and opinions of one quasi-literate and easily distracted ham radio operator:
1. Amazon is your friend, read the peoples' comments who take the time to rate their experiences;
2. The NanoVNA was a collaborative project with a really smart dude with a great idea. A cheap, easily manufactured piece of test equipment that can be improved upon without spending a fortune. The Chinese have taken low cost manufacturing to an art, often at the cost of component (and shielding) removal. There are several versions out there, Mine came with a battery and without shielding. I can take the time to add a diode for battery monitoring and shielding to improve RF isolation, it wasn't in my unit.
3. Don't expect the results that a $60k commercial Vector Network Analyzer will give, be realistic in the returns, and figure out ways to improve your interpretation of the results.
4.The firmware that shipped with my unit was hopelessly behind the curve on the capabilities that are currency offered. The small screen size and my lack of Superman vision led me to tie it into my laptop. To make that connection I had to learn to update firmware using Dfuse software (you'll learn about it later) across a USB in Windows 10. Each of these parts have many facets that could "brick" your new $50 investment.
5. Join the groups.io NanoVNA-users. Like drinking from a firehose, the secret is to slowly acclimate yourself to the environment then jump in. The knowledge base there is incredible, both technically and operationally. (Does the hardware allow this new measurement to be performed?)
6. Check out my 160 meter antenna sweep. It is a 65 foot grounded Rohn 25 with a three element Moseley TA-33M. Gamma shunt fed at 56 feet, the tri-bander acts as a capacitance hat. I had only a VSWR meter and a grid dip oscillator to find the resonant frequency of the tower. I guessed well, it appears.
NanoVNA160MVERT.jpg
Notice as well that VSWR(lower right) is a poor substitute for return loss(upper right), which is a much more accurate indication of antenna efficiency. I have worked 42 states and 8 countries on 160 using this antenna, and winter is around the corner!
Here is a phased pair of Cushcraft 11 element two meter yagis.
NanoVNA2Mdual11elbeams.jpg

Two things to note: I may have had a aberrant measurement while I moved a feedline. The sweep took about 5 minutes. Ignore that and imagine a smoothed line. There are two different resonant frequencies of this system. It could be that I wasn't exact with the electrical lengths of my homebrew phasing harness, or the antennas may not be tune to the same point of resonance. Either way, increasing usable bandwidth across two meters is a good thing at my QTH.

I'm still learning how to use the other capabilities of the unit, including time domain reflectometry. Being able to spot cable faults, and reasonably measure length will save me time in the long run. If you want to expand your vocabulary in RF, which is a good thing, this is a good investment. When you figure out that you need lab grade measurements, this will be a fond memory.
I can put on a presentation that will leave CMRA glassy eyed and asleep if necessary. Alternatively, I might expose myself as a fraud on the RF expert level.

On Thu, Oct 24, 2019 at 9:16 AM <tims173@...> wrote:
Chris,

Who did you buy your NanoVNA from.  I have looked on eBay and noticed there is quite a variety of combinations of pieces and parts from different sellers.

After testing it, do you still recommend it?

Thanks.

73

Tim E. Spurgeon
W0TES


Re: NanoVNA

Chris Swisher
 

Tim (and CMRA members),

The following is the observations and opinions of one quasi-literate and easily distracted ham radio operator:
1. Amazon is your friend, read the peoples' comments who take the time to rate their experiences;
2. The NanoVNA was a collaborative project with a really smart dude with a great idea. A cheap, easily manufactured piece of test equipment that can be improved upon without spending a fortune. The Chinese have taken low cost manufacturing to an art, often at the cost of component (and shielding) removal. There are several versions out there, Mine came with a battery and without shielding. I can take the time to add a diode for battery monitoring and shielding to improve RF isolation, it wasn't in my unit.
3. Don't expect the results that a $60k commercial Vector Network Analyzer will give, be realistic in the returns, and figure out ways to improve your interpretation of the results.
4.The firmware that shipped with my unit was hopelessly behind the curve on the capabilities that are currency offered. The small screen size and my lack of Superman vision led me to tie it into my laptop. To make that connection I had to learn to update firmware using Dfuse software (you'll learn about it later) across a USB in Windows 10. Each of these parts have many facets that could "brick" your new $50 investment.
5. Join the groups.io NanoVNA-users. Like drinking from a firehose, the secret is to slowly acclimate yourself to the environment then jump in. The knowledge base there is incredible, both technically and operationally. (Does the hardware allow this new measurement to be performed?)
6. Check out my 160 meter antenna sweep. It is a 65 foot grounded Rohn 25 with a three element Moseley TA-33M. Gamma shunt fed at 56 feet, the tri-bander acts as a capacitance hat. I had only a VSWR meter and a grid dip oscillator to find the resonant frequency of the tower. I guessed well, it appears.
NanoVNA160MVERT.jpg
Notice as well that VSWR(lower right) is a poor substitute for return loss(upper right), which is a much more accurate indication of antenna efficiency. I have worked 42 states and 8 countries on 160 using this antenna, and winter is around the corner!
Here is a phased pair of Cushcraft 11 element two meter yagis.
NanoVNA2Mdual11elbeams.jpg

Two things to note: I may have had a aberrant measurement while I moved a feedline. The sweep took about 5 minutes. Ignore that and imagine a smoothed line. There are two different resonant frequencies of this system. It could be that I wasn't exact with the electrical lengths of my homebrew phasing harness, or the antennas may not be tune to the same point of resonance. Either way, increasing usable bandwidth across two meters is a good thing at my QTH.

I'm still learning how to use the other capabilities of the unit, including time domain reflectometry. Being able to spot cable faults, and reasonably measure length will save me time in the long run. If you want to expand your vocabulary in RF, which is a good thing, this is a good investment. When you figure out that you need lab grade measurements, this will be a fond memory.
I can put on a presentation that will leave CMRA glassy eyed and asleep if necessary. Alternatively, I might expose myself as a fraud on the RF expert level.

On Thu, Oct 24, 2019 at 9:16 AM <tims173@...> wrote:
Chris,

Who did you buy your NanoVNA from.  I have looked on eBay and noticed there is quite a variety of combinations of pieces and parts from different sellers.

After testing it, do you still recommend it?

Thanks.

73

Tim E. Spurgeon
W0TES


Re: NanoVNA

Fred Dittrich
 

Chris

Thanks for bird dogging this. I am happy with my AA-600 but at this almost pocket change price, I think anyone who has any question about what their antenna is doing and wants to know RIGHT NOW, this looks like a must to have in the shack.

73

Fred AE0FD



At 03:36 PM 10/22/2019, you wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2019/08/11/nanovna-is-a-50-vector-network-analyzer/

I couldn't stand it any longer, and ordered one of these for evaluation. It now is capable of 50 kHz to 1.5 gHz and supports time domain reflectometry, and talks to a Windows 10 or iOS laptop over the USB. Anyone else playing?