Topics

Apollo 11: The Complete Descent video

John Beatty
 

On July 20, 1969, 50 years ago history was made.  Here's a nice replay of the descent on YouTube (link below) with a good bit of the real-time drama such as alarms going off, they are off course a bit, computer programs acting not very trustworthy and radios dropping in and out of signal (we can relate).  Be sure to share with your kids, grandkids on July 20.  It was special.  I hope you like it.   John - NO0I 

https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc

paul watt
 

Great video, thanks John!!

On Jul 6, 2019 08:11, John Beatty <jebeatty@...> wrote:
On July 20, 1969, 50 years ago history was made.  Here's a nice replay of the descent on YouTube (link below) with a good bit of the real-time drama such as alarms going off, they are off course a bit, computer programs acting not very trustworthy and radios dropping in and out of signal (we can relate).  Be sure to share with your kids, grandkids on July 20.  It was special.  I hope you like it.   John - NO0I 

https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc

dee bergstrand
 

That was great John!  Thanks for sharing!

Dee
KC0DEO 


On Jul 6, 2019, at 8:11 AM, John Beatty <jebeatty@...> wrote:

On July 20, 1969, 50 years ago history was made.  Here's a nice replay of the descent on YouTube (link below) with a good bit of the real-time drama such as alarms going off, they are off course a bit, computer programs acting not very trustworthy and radios dropping in and out of signal (we can relate).  Be sure to share with your kids, grandkids on July 20.  It was special.  I hope you like it.   John - NO0I 

https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc

Tim Spurgeon
 

John,

Thanks for sharing this. This week I have been watching some yutubes about the Apollo project and I was in awe of how good the equipment looked. The amount of testing (and retesting) performed on every aspect of the project is amazing. For example, a problem discovered prior to any Saturn V launches was a "Pogo" phenomenon where the rockets would oscillate in thrust and slosh the fuel and oxidizer up and down, violently. This cycle of more fuel, less fuel caused the thrust to increase and decrease. The "Pogo" was addressed and fixes made to help insure the smooth fuel/oxidizer flow. They thought the problem was solved. During the launch of the first full mock-up of Saturn V, during the burn of the first stage, the problem appeared again and when the second stage was supposed to kick in, it failed and the rocket crashed and burned. After the crash, parts were inspected, and it was discovered that the "Pogo" was so severe that it damaged the second stage rocket nozzles, rendering them unusable, and would have killed the astronauts, if any would have been on board.

The "Landing Module" descent that you shared with all of us also demonstrates the depth of human backup; there seemed to be a human monitoring every sensor on the spacecraft. You can here this chatter (on the right side of the screen) where monitors are calling out telemetry data almost real-time, as the astronauts are performing tasks. This deep field of other engineers (monitoring and calculating solutions to problems) no doubt was the reason that NASA could save Apollo 13.

NASA started out trailing the Russians, but won the race to the moon with slow, steady effort that valued human life.

Thanks again, John.

73

Tim
W0TES

*************************************************8

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Beatty" <jebeatty@...>
To: main@CMRA.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 6, 2019 8:11:24 AM
Subject: [CMRA] Apollo 11: The Complete Descent video

On July 20, 1969, 50 years ago history was made.  Here's a nice replay of the descent on YouTube (link below) with a good bit of the real-time drama such as alarms going off, they are off course a bit, computer programs acting not very trustworthy and radios dropping in and out of signal (we can relate).  Be sure to share with your kids, grandkids on July 20.  It was special.  I hope you like it.   John - NO0I

https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc

John Beatty
 

Thanks everyone.  I'm hopeful we'll return to the moon one of these days. 

On Sat, Jul 6, 2019 at 12:01 PM Tim Spurgeon <tims173@...> wrote:
John,

Thanks for sharing this.  This week I have been watching some yutubes about the Apollo project and I was in awe of how good the equipment looked.  The amount of testing (and retesting) performed on every aspect of the project is amazing.  For example, a problem discovered prior to any Saturn V launches was a "Pogo" phenomenon where the rockets would oscillate in thrust and slosh the fuel and oxidizer up and down, violently.  This cycle of more fuel, less fuel caused the thrust to increase and decrease.  The "Pogo" was addressed and fixes made to help insure the smooth fuel/oxidizer flow.  They thought the problem was solved.  During the launch of the first full mock-up of Saturn V, during the burn of the first stage, the problem appeared again and when the second stage was supposed to kick in, it failed and the rocket crashed and burned.  After the crash, parts were inspected, and it was discovered that the "Pogo" was so severe that it damaged the second stage rocket nozzles, rendering them unusable, and would have killed the astronauts, if any would have been on board.

The "Landing Module" descent that you shared with all of us also demonstrates the depth of human backup; there seemed to be a human monitoring every sensor on the spacecraft.  You can here this chatter (on the right side of the screen) where monitors are calling out telemetry data almost real-time, as the astronauts are performing tasks.  This deep field of other engineers (monitoring and calculating solutions to problems) no doubt was the reason that NASA could save Apollo 13.

NASA started out trailing the Russians, but won the race to the moon with slow, steady effort that valued human life.

Thanks again, John.

73

Tim
W0TES

*************************************************8
----- Original Message -----
From: "John Beatty" <jebeatty@...>
To: main@CMRA.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 6, 2019 8:11:24 AM
Subject: [CMRA] Apollo 11: The Complete Descent video

On July 20, 1969, 50 years ago history was made.  Here's a nice replay of the descent on YouTube (link below) with a good bit of the real-time drama such as alarms going off, they are off course a bit, computer programs acting not very trustworthy and radios dropping in and out of signal (we can relate).  Be sure to share with your kids, grandkids on July 20.  It was special.  I hope you like it.   John - NO0I

https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc






Hillman, Richard E.
 

Wow.  Thank you

On Jul 6, 2019, at 2:22 PM, John Beatty <jebeatty@...> wrote:

Thanks everyone.  I'm hopeful we'll return to the moon one of these days. 

On Sat, Jul 6, 2019 at 12:01 PM Tim Spurgeon <tims173@...> wrote:
John,

Thanks for sharing this.  This week I have been watching some yutubes about the Apollo project and I was in awe of how good the equipment looked.  The amount of testing (and retesting) performed on every aspect of the project is amazing.  For example, a problem discovered prior to any Saturn V launches was a "Pogo" phenomenon where the rockets would oscillate in thrust and slosh the fuel and oxidizer up and down, violently.  This cycle of more fuel, less fuel caused the thrust to increase and decrease.  The "Pogo" was addressed and fixes made to help insure the smooth fuel/oxidizer flow.  They thought the problem was solved.  During the launch of the first full mock-up of Saturn V, during the burn of the first stage, the problem appeared again and when the second stage was supposed to kick in, it failed and the rocket crashed and burned.  After the crash, parts were inspected, and it was discovered that the "Pogo" was so severe that it damaged the second stage rocket nozzles, rendering them unusable, and would have killed the astronauts, if any would have been on board.

The "Landing Module" descent that you shared with all of us also demonstrates the depth of human backup; there seemed to be a human monitoring every sensor on the spacecraft.  You can here this chatter (on the right side of the screen) where monitors are calling out telemetry data almost real-time, as the astronauts are performing tasks.  This deep field of other engineers (monitoring and calculating solutions to problems) no doubt was the reason that NASA could save Apollo 13.

NASA started out trailing the Russians, but won the race to the moon with slow, steady effort that valued human life.

Thanks again, John.

73

Tim
W0TES

*************************************************8
----- Original Message -----
From: "John Beatty" <jebeatty@...>
To: main@CMRA.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, July 6, 2019 8:11:24 AM
Subject: [CMRA] Apollo 11: The Complete Descent video

On July 20, 1969, 50 years ago history was made.  Here's a nice replay of the descent on YouTube (link below) with a good bit of the real-time drama such as alarms going off, they are off course a bit, computer programs acting not very trustworthy and radios dropping in and out of signal (we can relate).  Be sure to share with your kids, grandkids on July 20.  It was special.  I hope you like it.   John - NO0I

https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc






Henry Taylor
 

Given away already; thanks for asking

On 7/6/19 8:11 AM, John Beatty wrote:
On July 20, 1969, 50 years ago history was made.  Here's a nice replay of the descent on YouTube (link below) with a good bit of the real-time drama such as alarms going off, they are off course a bit, computer programs acting not very trustworthy and radios dropping in and out of signal (we can relate).  Be sure to share with your kids, grandkids on July 20.  It was special.  I hope you like it.   John - NO0I 

https://youtu.be/xc1SzgGhMKc